Gertie and Audie

Gertrude Emma Mathilde Bellmann was born on January 13, 1903, making her today’s birthday girl.  Her parents were Martin and Martha (Lohmann) Bellmann of Altenburg.  I do not have a photo of Martha, but I do have one of Martin. In fact, another post told Martin’s story.  It was titled, Pound the Hammer, Ring the … More Gertie and Audie

Edible Concrete

Today’s post is, as promised, a continuation of yesterday’s story.  We told the saga yesterday of the Motz family of carriage makers who were part of the 1839 German immigration to Missouri.  We ended that story by telling how Henry and Laura Motz were buried in the Concordia Cemetery in St. Louis.  We said yesterday … More Edible Concrete

Lots of Motz Carts

Heinrich and Catharina (Roth) Motz came to America prior to 1839 and were living in New York.  When they heard about the Stephanite immigration to Missouri which was taking place in 1838-1839, they joined quite a few other New Yorkers to move to Missouri to join this group of German Lutherans.  As we have mentioned … More Lots of Motz Carts

Which of the Original Immigrants Was the Last to Die? Part 2

In the process of making additions to our German Family Tree, our dedicated researcher and creator of that document, Lynn Degenhardt, has come across some information which leads us to consider the question again, “Which of the original immigrants was the last to die?” When I arrived in Perry County after I retired several years … More Which of the Original Immigrants Was the Last to Die? Part 2

The Advent of the Phone

Hugo Palisch’s birthday on January 7, 1892 will be the gateway for discussing some of the early developments in the history of the telephone.  First, let me tell you a little bit about Hugo.  After being born in Frohna, Hugo was baptized at Concordia Lutheran Church.  His parents were Charles and Lydia (Engelmann) Palisch.  In … More The Advent of the Phone

The Bold Immigrants

In the German language, the word kühn means “bold” or “daring”.  There were two surnames in the Gesellschaft that contained kühn, Kühn and Kühnert.  As time went by, many German names containing an umlaut had that umlaut eliminated and replaced by putting an “e” after the vowel with the umlaut.  So these two surnames became … More The Bold Immigrants