Bergmann Boyfriend’s Bicentennial

I managed to find another bicentennial birthday for today’s post. The person born 200 years ago was Albert Fassold. Albert was born on March 6, 1821 in the Bavarian region in Germany. He was the son of John and Mary (Sitter) Fassold. When Albert was 19 years old, he came with his parents and several siblings to America aboard the Plato which arrived in this county in 1840. The passenger list for that ship contained several other names of folks that settled in Perry County, most notably some Bergmann families. Below you will see the Fassold family from the Plato’s passenger list. Albert was called Albrecht on this document.

Fassold family – Plato passenger list – 1840

Albert Fassold would get married to Margaretha Bergmann. Let’s take a look at some information about Albert Fassold that is found in the Friedenberg Remembrances book.

Albert Fassold information – Friedenberg book

Margaretha Bergmann was born on August 27, 1829, the daughter of George and Margaretha (Bergmann) Bergmann. That’s right, Margaretha’s parents were the result of a Bergmann/Bergmann marriage back in Bavaria. Because there were a couple George Bergmann’s, Margaretha’s father has been called “Creek George” over the years.

Albert’s bio states that he came to the United States with “Creek George” Bergmann. I looked over the whole Plato passenger list and did find the Bergmann group shown below. However, the ages of the members are not correct. Margaretha would have been about 10 years old.

Bergmann’s – Plato passenger list – 1840

The Friedenberg book contains some information about Margaretha also. It is shown below.

Margaretha Fassold information – Friedenberg book

Albert Fassold married Margaretha Bergmann sometime before 1848, but I was not able to locate a marriage record for them. They became members of Peace Lutheran Church in Friedenberg, but the biographical information shown earlier does not list a marriage date for these two. I do know that Andreas Fassold, probably Albert’s brother, got married at a later date, and he was married by a justice of the peace. If Albert did likewise, that would make finding his marriage record more difficult.

Our German Family Tree lists 9 children born to this Fassold couple. The descendants from this pair take up 5 pages in the GFT. The first child was born in 1848 and the last one in the 1870’s. Believe it or not, one of these Fassold children married a Bergmann. We find the Fassold household in the 1850 census living with Margaretha’s parents. Albert is called a cooper.

1850 census – Cinque Hommes Township, MO

The Fassold family was considerably larger in the 1860 census in which Albert is now called a farmer.

1860 census – Cinque Hommes Township, MO

Another son was born later during 1860, but then there is a gap in childbearing until 1865. That was probably the result of Albert performing military service during the Civil War. His military record displayed below states that he was part of Captain Ochs’ 64th Regiment of the E.M.M.

Albert Fassold – Civil War military record

Albert and Margaretha’s rather full household can be seen in the 1870 census. Their entry spills over two census pages. Albert continued to be a farmer. Margaretha’s father, “Creek George” Bergmann, was back again in their household.

1870 census – Cinque Hommes Township, MO

Next, we find the Fassold family in the 1880 census. This time they were living in the Central Township of Perry County. Albert’s father-in-law was still living with them.

1880 census – Central Township, MO

Margaretha Fassold died in 1896 at the age of 67. Albert died in 1900 at the age of 79. He died in November, so I figured he should be found in the 1900 census, but I was unable to locate him. Albert and Margaretha are buried in the Peace Lutheran Cemetery in Friedenberg.

I searched our German Family Tree to see if there are any more bicentennial birthdays during this month of March. I did not find any more. So this will be the last 200th birthday for a while. Albert’s special birthday was certainly worth the attention he was given today.


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