The Republik Sails to the Republic

November 12th was the day of departure from Bremerhaven, Germany of the Republik, a ship full of German Lutherans who were looking for a new start in America.  Here are a few photos of the passenger lists as they were recorded when the ship arrived in New Orleans on January 12, 1839.

lam259_17-0674
Republik
passenger list – page 1
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Republik
passenger list – page 2

The Gotthold Loeber family was on this ship, and Rev. Loeber no doubt provided some of the spiritual guidance that people may have desired on the voyage.  I have personal interest in this ship because my Schmidt ancestors were on board.  You can see Joachim Schmidt listed on page one as a locksmith.  One passenger, Friedrich Gottlieb Mueller, died on the voyage.  A Mueller family history that we have in the museum says that he died of a severe cold and was buried in the Gulf of Mexico.  Also, no babies were born on this ship, although some were born on other ships.  One hundred ten passengers arrived in New Orleans.

The Republik was described as a barque.  Although we do not have a photo of that ship, here is a photo of a three-masted barque that may have resembled the Republik.  I am sure that this ship pictured is one that would have sailed quite a bit later than the 1830’s.  However, I did find a little evidence that the Republik was still sailing in 1870.

barque
Barque

I picked several of the German towns found on the passenger list and placed them on a map of Germany.  You can see that many of these people came from the same vicinity in Germany.  The cities are shown with yellow stars on the map.

german-towns-on-republik

After arriving in New Orleans, these immigrants traveled on the steamboat Knickerbocker up the Mississippi to St. Louis.  The story of their arrival in St. Louis was the very first post on this blog back on January 30th…..Arrival of the Knickerbocker.

There would be two other ships to leave at a later date….the Olbers and the Amalia.

 


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