Anton Gets Palisch-ed

Anton Schade, if he was still alive, would be celebrating his 130th birthday today.  He was born on August 8, 1889.  I admit that what I was really looking for today was a person who was born or married on August 8, 1888 (8/8/88), but none could be found in our German Family Tree.  I did find one birthday on 8/8/87 and this one for Anton on 8/8/89.  I chose to do Anton’s story today.

Anton was the son of Robert and Elizabeth (Engert) Schade.  He was baptized at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Altenburg.  Since Immanuel baptism records back in those days extend across two pages of the book in which they were recorded, I have to show his record in two images.

Anton Schade baptism record Immanuel Altenburg MO

Anton Schade baptism record 2 Immanuel Altenburg MO
Anton Schade baptism record – Immanuel, Altenburg, MO

It would not be until 1900 that Anton could be found in a United States census.  He was 11 years old, and he was the oldest child in his family.

Anton Schade 1900 census Brazeau Township MO
1900 census – Brazeau Township, MO

Anton could still be found living in the same household in 1910.

Anton Schade 1910 census Brazeau Township MO
1910 census – Brazeau Township, MO

In the time period between 1910 and 1920, Anton spent some time in Iowa.  We get documentation for this from his World War I draft registration form where we see him listing his address as being in Iowa.

005248850_03577
Anton Schade – WWI draft registration

The form indicates that Anton is living in Tripoli, Iowa, and his employer was Edward Thurm, who was also a Perry County native and had also married Anton’s sister, Ida Schade.  A few previous posts told the tale of Perry County folks who moved to Bremen County, Iowa.  You can read those posts by clicking on the links below:

That Thurm Throng

From the Hills of Perry County to the Fields of Tripoli

Anton, like all of the other folks I have located in that vicinity were members of Immanuel Lutheran Church in Altenburg before their relocation.

Anton did not remain in Iowa.  He returned to Perry County before the 1920 census was taken.  Although I have no proof of this, I think the reason for his return was the fact that his mother had died in 1913, and then in October of 1917, his father also died.  Anton also had a younger sister, Frieda Schade, die earlier in 1917 also.  His next younger brother, Rudolph, had gotten married in 1916.  Interestingly, Rudolph married Frieda Thurm, who I think was Edward Thurm’s cousin.  Rudolph was living on the Thurm farm according to his World War I draft registration form.  Another younger brother, Reinhart Schade, was also living in Tripoli, Iowa in 1917.  I think Anton had to return to this area in order to farm the Schade land.

Now we must backtrack to discuss the early life of Anton’s bride.  Her name was Marie (Mary) Palisch.  She was the daughter of Louis (Ludwig) and Pauline (Grother) Palisch.  I don’t have a photo of her mother, but we do have this wonderful photograph of her father sporting his bowler and bristles.

Louis Palisch
Louis Palisch

Mary was born on February 1, 1887 and baptized at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Altenburg.  Below is another one of those Immanuel baptism records in two images.

Marie Palisch baptism record Immanuel Altenburg MO

Marie Palisch baptism record 2 Immanuel Altenburg MO
Mary Palisch baptism record – Immanuel, Altenburg, MO

We find Mary in the 1900 census for Brazeau Township.  Mary was just one of two children in this family, and in 1900, she was 13 years old.

Mary Palisch 1900 census Brazeau Township MO
1900 census – Brazeau Township, MO

We have this photograph of Mary when she was rather young.

Marie Palisch
Mary Palisch

Most of the Palisch land in Perry County was to be found in the Dresden area, but Mary’s father’s property was found just north of Altenburg.

Louis Palisch land map 1915
Louis Palisch land map – 1915

Mary is still in the same household in the 1910 census.

Mary Palisch 1910 census Brazeau Township MO
1910 census – Brazeau Township, MO

That brings us up to the wedding of Anton and Mary.  They were married on January 4, 1920 at Immanuel Lutheran, Altenburg.  Here is their marriage license.

Schade Palisch marriage license
Schade/Palisch marriage license

Since they were married so early in 1920, these two show up as a married couple in the census for that year.  It appears that Anton and Mary were either living with or near Mary’s parents.

Anton Schade 1920 census Brazeau Township MO
1920 census – Brazeau Township, MO

Like Mary’s Palisch family, this family had just two children, a boy and a girl.  We find both of them in the 1930 census.  That census indicated that Anton worked at odd jobs.

Anton Schade 1930 census Brazeau Township MO
1930 census – Brazeau Township, MO

The 1940 census is the last one in which to find Anton and Mary.  The census indicates they lived in Altenburg.

Anton Schade 1940 census Altenburg MO
1940 census – Altenburg, MO

Gerard Fiehler says he remembers Anton Schade, and he tells me that Anton lived in a home not far north of Trinity Lutheran Church.  I have indicated its location on the map below with an arrow.

Anton Schade residence
Anton Schade residence

The photo below shows the Anton Schade family (and their automobile).  I am guessing that it was taken sometime around 1930.  Mary is holding Florence, and Leo is standing in front of Anton.

Anton Schade family
Anton Schade family

There is also evidence that Anton later worked for the railroad because I found an index on Ancestry.com that includes him on a railroad retirement pension database.

Mary died in 1970 at the age of 83; Anton died in 1984 at the age of 94.  Their deaths are too recent for us to look at their death certificates.  Anton and Mary are buried together in the Immanuel Lutheran Cemetery in Altenburg.

Anton and Mary Schade gravestone Immanuel Altenburg MO
Anton and Mary Schade gravestone – Immanuel, Altenburg, MO

In closing, let me show you the list of charter members of Immanuel Lutheran Church in Altenburg.

immanuel-altenburg-charter-members
Immanuel, Altenburg charter members

You can see quite a few names from this post on the above list….Engert, Grother, Palisch, and Thurm.  You do not see the name Schade.  In a previous blog post, Cool Schades, it noted that the Schade name showed up on the scene in the early 1860’s, not long after Immanuel began in 1857.  The characters in this story are almost exclusively tied to Immanuel.

 

 


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